UNDERCARRIAGE

MEASUREMENTS

(Still under construction)

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It is important to get a link number off the side of your link before evaluating your measurements.  Be sure all surfaces are clean, as little as 1/10 of an inch in error makes a BIG difference.

Link Height: It is important to get a link number off the side of your link before evaluating your measurements.  Be sure all surfaces are clean, as little as 1/10 of an inch in error makes a BIG difference.

What you are after is the measurement of the diameter of the wear surface.  This measurement technique lets you measure the roller while it is still on the machine.  Measure "B" and subtract the link height.  The result is the radius of the worn surface so multiply times 2 to get the diameter.  2(B-C)=Diameter

Roller Height: What you are after is the measurement of the diameter of the wear surface.  This measurement technique lets you measure the roller while it is still on the machine.  Measure "B" and subtract the link height.  The result is the radius of the worn surface so multiply times 2 to get the diameter.  2(B-C)=Diameter

Pitch (internal wear, sometimes called "stretch") is found by measuring across 5 track pins, center too center.  Make sure your tracks are tight (See Hints below)  Divide the measure you came up with by 4, and you have a comparison figure to correspond with what your pitch was when new.

Pitch: (internal wear, sometimes called "stretch") is found by measuring across 5 track pins, center too center.  Make sure your tracks are tight (See Hints below)  Divide the measure you came up with by 4, and you have a comparison figure to correspond with what your pitch was when new.

In this exercise you are trying to determine how worn your wear surfaces are when compared to new.  You want the distance from the top of the center guiding ridge to the lowest point on your wear surfaces.  They should not be dished or concave.

Idler Wear: In this exercise you are trying to determine how worn your wear surfaces are when compared to new.  You want the distance from the top of the center guiding ridge to the lowest point on your wear surfaces.  They should not be dished or concave.

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Grouser Height: Make sure the tracks are straight and pads are level when measuring.

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Carrier Roller:  You want to measure the diameter of the wear surfaces.  Measure where they are the most worn.  The wear surfaces should not be dished or concave and should not have any flat spots.  The flanges should be repaired as needed.  Check for bearing tightness.

 

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Terex track frame rendered

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Sprockets:  Points on the sprocket teeth are a reflection of stretched track (worn internally) which is riding up on the sides of the sprocket teeth rather than in the bottom of the root where they are supposed to run.  The bottom of the root is your contact area for good track so don't change sprockets just because the teeth are pointed.  Good track will not be riding on the sides of the teeth.

 

      For a more detailed description of how undercarriage components work with each other, read an old IH Track School Manual
(Right click and click "Save Target As..." to download instead)

HINTS FOR MEASURING

Undercarriage HINTS #1 Undercarriage Hints #2
TD25B Link Measurements and Wear Guide td9 LINK HEIGHT
FAQ: D6 9U Undercarriage TD9 Measuring/Evaluating Pitch